The Student News Site of Souderton Area High School

The Arrowhead

The Arrowhead

The Student News Site of Souderton Area High School

The Arrowhead

The Student News Site of Souderton Area High School

The Arrowhead

The Arrowhead

Arrowhead alumni carry lessons, memories

After graduating from high school many years ago, some previous members of The Arrowhead still fondly remember their time on the paper and are positively impacted by the lessons they learned in class. Some alumni have been able to apply the skills learned directly to their current careers.
Throwback%E2%80%A6Interviewing+Phillies+pitcher+and+Souderton+alumni+Jamie+Moyer%2C+former+Arrowhead+sports+editor+Meghan+McSloy+%28left%29+and+editor+in+chief+Abigail+Kramer-Hunt+sit+in+the+Citizens+Bank+Park%E2%80%99s+dugout.+McSloy+and+Hunt+interviewed+Moyer+during+the+2006-2007+school+year.+
Rose Ann Kramer
Throwback…Interviewing Phillies pitcher and Souderton alumni Jamie Moyer, former Arrowhead sports editor Meghan McSloy (left) and editor in chief Abigail Kramer-Hunt sit in the Citizens Bank Park’s dugout. McSloy and Hunt interviewed Moyer during the 2006-2007 school year.

Due to the high expectations and important lessons learned during their time on The Arrowhead, many past members still practice both the journalistic and life skills developed during their high school years.
Former staff writer Spencer Trabbold and former opinion editor Jessica Bard now work in fields directly related to journalism.
Trabbold, who graduated from Souderton in 2014, is an executive producer for ABC 7 News in Fort Myers, Florida while Bard, who graduated in 2010, is a managing digital editor for Consultant 360.
Bard was also a news reporter for seven years after graduating from Suffolk University.
For Trabbold, the newspaper helped prepare him for college.
“I think [The Arrowhead] really put me ahead of the game in [college],” Trabbold said. “Taking that class meant I already had a leg up over people I was competing against for jobs.”
Trabbold also said that the concept of selling ads was a very “important” and “unique” thing to learn as he feels it is “not talked about enough” even though money is essential to getting products out in the world.
“At the time, [selling ads] seems like an inconvenience as a student, but it really gives you a true idea of the reality of journalism and the real world,” Trabbold said.
According to Bard, the class helped her better understand what she enjoyed doing along with teaching her how to ask for what she may need at any time.
“Even today I’m not afraid to ask for anything that I want from a manager, or someone that I’m interviewing. I would always rather ask than get it wrong,” Bard said.
Similarly, former sports editor and editor-in-chief Abigail Kramer-Hunt said that the “biggest” thing she learned from the class is that she can do “anything” she puts her mind to.
Hunt, who graduated in 2007, is currently a family and newborn photographer.
Souderton English teacher Ian Smith was The Arrowhead’s entertainment editor and Souderton social studies teacher Josh Myers, was entertainment and sports editor during their years on The Arrowhead.
Smith and Myers graduated in 2010.Smith and Myers find they are able to apply some of the life-skills learned in the class to their current jobs. Myers took away the “work-ethic” and ability to deal with “high expectations,” along with writing skills and leadership qualities.
“[The Arrowhead] helped me come out of my shell. Leading [article] brainstorming [sessions] helped me become comfortable with talking in front of people while getting all those ideas out,” Myers said. “In a way, I take those interactions back to the classroom.”
Smith said that the class has many “unique” qualities that make it different from any other class in the high school, even more like a “job.”
“I think people shy away from it at times because it can be challenging, especially with deadlines and people get nervous about that,” Smith said, “but, if you do it right it’s like having a job that you really care about with a group of your friends, which makes it really enjoyable.”
The alumni also have very fond memories of the class.
Hunt was able to interview several big names, including former Phillies pitcher Jamie Moyer in the Citizen’s Bank dugout and actors Amanda Bynes and Channing Tatum who were on a press tour for their 2006 movie, “She’s the Man.”
“I would never expect at 17 years old to be interviewing one of my favorite baseball players, and I would never expect to be interviewing Amanda Bynes,” Hunt said. “It’s pretty neat to look back and say, ‘Wow, I could do all of that as a high schooler because I decided to try.’”

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Melanie Vincent, Features Editor

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